Kid-friendly Limealicious Mad Scientist Soda Recipe - Sticky Fingers Cooking
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Recipe: Limealicious Mad Scientist Soda

Recipe: Limealicious Mad Scientist Soda

Limealicious Mad Scientist Soda

by Erin Fletter
Photo by Luis Echeverri Urrea/Shutterstock.com
prep time
10 minutes
cook time
makes
4-6 servings

Equipment Checklist

  • Liquid measuring cup
  • Citrus juicer (optional)
  • Measuring spoons
  • Dry measuring cups
scale
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Ingredients

Limealicious Mad Scientist Soda

  • 5 large limes, juiced
  • 1/2 to 2/3 C cold water (amount equal to lime juice)
  • 2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 C powdered sugar
  • ice

Instructions

Limealicious Mad Scientist Soda

1.
cut + squeeze + pour

Cut 5 limes in half and squeeze as much juice as you can into a liquid measuring cup. How much juice do you have? Add an equal amount of cold water (approximately 1/2 to 2/3 cup) to a large pitcher, then add the lime juice. Measure and add 2 teaspoons of baking soda to the pitcher. Stir! Watch it bubble and create soda!

2.
add + stir + pour + cheers!

Add 1/2 cup of powdered sugar to the pitcher and stir to combine. Taste! If it needs more sugar, add it by the tablespoon. Divide into glasses filled with ice. Cheers!

Surprise Ingredient: Lime!

back to recipe
Photo by Waridsara_HappyChildren/Shutterstock.com

Hi!  I’m Lime!

"Limes are citrus fruits just like lemons, but we're smaller, rounder, and green. And, while lemons are acidic and sour, limes are more acidic, less sweet, and have a more bitter flavor. We're often invited into the same places as lemons, but you'll probably find us in more savory than sweet dishes, although our Key lime sibling is famous for its pie!"  

History & Etymology

  • Limes are the fruit of tropical citrus trees closely related to lemons. They are native to Southeast Asia. Currently, India, Mexico, and China produce the most limes globally. 
  • In the 19th century, sailors drank their daily grog (beer or rum) with added lemon juice to prevent scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C. Later, they changed to lime juice. British sailors were derogatorily called "limeys" because of their use of limes. Navies who prevented scurvy by their daily lemon or lime intake would have the advantage over a country's navy that did not use citrus in their diets. 
  • There are several species of lime plants, and many are hybrids. The type of lime generally sold in grocery stores is the Persian or Tahitian lime, a hybrid of a Key lime and a lemon. The Key lime, native to Southeast Asia, is also known as the West Indian lime; however, the Key lime name comes from the Florida Keys, where it flavors their famous Key lime pie. Spanish explorers brought the lime to Florida in the 16th century. The Kaffir or Makrut lime is native to Southeast Asia and southern China. These three limes are the most widely produced worldwide, with the Persian leading the other two.
  • The English word "lime" comes from mid-17th century French from the Spanish "lima," from the Arabic līma, and the Persian "limu."

Anatomy

  • Since the Persian lime is the most popular, we will focus on its anatomy. The fruit is about 2.4 inches in diameter. It has no seeds, is larger, less acidic, and has a thicker skin than a Key lime.  
  • A citrus fruit's "zest" is the green or yellow outermost layer of the peel (skin), which contains powerful flavor compounds. The "pith" is the spongy, white layer between the skin and the flesh and is quite bitter. Avoid the pith when zesting your fruit.

How to Pick, Buy, & Eat

  • Select limes that are firm and heavy (more juice!) with shiny, blemish-free, green skins.
  • Limes are fully ripe and juicier when they are yellow, not dark green; however, they are usually sold when they are green and have better flavor.
  • If you refrigerate your limes, they will last about two weeks. You can freeze lime juice to use at a later time. 
  • The average lime contains one tablespoon of juice. Roll a room-temperature lime on the counter, adding light pressure, before cutting it open to get the maximum amount of liquid. 
  • Limes are highly acidic, and this acid will react with different foods in different ways. For example, the acid will denature the proteins in fish and seafood, causing the fish to become firm and opaque, almost as if you had cooked it. The acid in lime juice can also curdle milk, and while it can cause green vegetables to turn a drab olive color, it will help vegetables such as potatoes and turnips maintain their white color.
  • You can substitute lime for lemon in a dish, but you will want to decrease the amount due to a lime's stronger flavor and acidity. For example, if a recipe calls for one cup of lemon juice, substitute three-quarters of a cup of lime juice.
  • Here are some foods you can add lime to (besides Key lime pie): limeade, dressings and dips, guacamole, salsa, lime curd, lime bars, sherbet, fajitas, tacos, chicken, fish, beef, and pork.

Nutrition

  • One lime has 32 percent of the daily value of vitamin C, which boosts immunity and helps your body heal.
  • Citrus fruits, like lemons and limes, have citric acid, which can help prevent kidney stones from forming. 
  • Limes do not contain very much natural sugar. That's why they are so tart! Compared with an orange, another citrus fruit, a lime has one gram of sugar, and a small orange has nine grams.

 

What causes the Fizz in our Soda?

Photo by HalynaRom/Shutterstock.com
  • When baking soda, or sodium bicarbonate, is mixed with an acid, like the citric acid in lemon juice, a chemical reaction occurs that causes carbon dioxide gas (CO2) to form. This results in lots of bubbles and fizziness! Store-bought soda also gets its fizz from CO2.

Lettuce Joke Around

What do citrus fruits like to eat? 

Lime-a-beans!

THYME for a Laugh

What do you get when you cross a brontosaurus with a lime? 

A dino-sour!

Lettuce Joke Around

What do you call a lime that opens doors? 

A Key Lime!

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